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THIRD PHASE OF 'TEEN THINKING' UNDERAGE DRINKING CAMPAIGN LAUNCHES

Topeka, KS (July 11, 2011) – The Kansas Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant (SPF-SIG) project recently launched the third phase of its Teen Thinking multimedia advertising campaign to reduce underage drinking. Radio spots, billboards, print ads, posters and other promotional materials began rolling out in the grant communities in May.

In the 2011 Kansas Communities That Care Student Survey, 24.2 percent of Kansas 6th-, 8th-, 10th- and 12th-graders reported they had had alcohol in the past 30 days, with 12.7 percent of them saying they had engaged in binge drinking at least once within the past two weeks. Fourteen communities were awarded funding as part of the SPF-SIG project in 2008. Since various efforts in those communities began the following year—including the Teen Thinking campaign—there has been a 5.4 percent reduction of reported 30-day use in those targeted communities.

The first Teen Thinking ad campaign in 2009 had the goal of reaching parents and encouraging them to talk to their teens about the dangers of underage drinking. In 2010, it focused on the consequences of underage drinking and social hosting. This year's campaign again focuses on consequences for teens and adults, while encouraging parents to talk to their kids about making the right choices.

Sarah Fischer, SPF-SIG project director, says that though the grant project is making great progress increasing awareness and prevention on underage drinking in the 14 grant communities, more work and engagement is needed in other parts of the state. In the Kansas Communities That Care Student Survey, nearly 23 percent of Kansas youth said that that alcohol was "very easy to get" and 65 percent of those surveyed said they didn't believe they would be caught if they drank.

The Kansas Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant was awarded to the Office of the Governor in 2006 from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

March 2, 2011

SUCCESS STORIES

The issue of how to share successes and lessons learned across communities has long been a concern of prevention practitioners, and with the advent of the Internet with nearly instantaneous access to information and multimedia resources in just a couple of clicks, mechanisms for sharing information have become better and better.

In the spirit of using technology to maximize learning and resource sharing to support our efforts in the prevention and reduction of underage drinking, we are rolling out the newest addition to the Kansas SPF Workstation – the Success Stories tab!

We are very excited about this page, which will highlight some grand achievements by the 14 SPF-funded communities. We hope you will check it out, engage in some discussion, and maybe even be inspired to share your own success story!

August 26, 2009

NATIONAL CENTER ON ADDICTION AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE (CASA) RELEASES 2009 TEEN SURVEY RESULTS

In a press release dated August 26, 2009, the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University announced results of the 2009 CASA Teen Survey. According to the press release, teens who have seen their parents drunk are more than twice as likely to get drunk in a typical month, and three times more likely to use marijuana and smoke cigarettes, when compared to teens who have not seen their parents drunk. Other findings from the survey—National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse XIV: Teens and Parents, the 14th annual back-to-school survey conducted by The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University—include:

  • 51 percent of 17-year olds have seen one or both of their parents drunk and 34 percent of 12- to 17-year olds have seen one or both of their parents drunk;
  • Compared to teens who believe their father is against their drinking, teens who believe their father is okay with their drinking are two and a half times more likely to get drunk in a typical month;
  • Five percent of 12- to 15-year old girls and nine percent of 12- to 15-year old boys say their fathers are okay with their drinking. Thirteen percent of 16- and 17-year old girls and 20 percent of 16- and 17-year old boys say their fathers are okay with their drinking.
  • 65 percent of 12- to 17-year olds who drink monthly report that they get drunk at least once in a typical month. Eighty-five percent of 17-year old drinkers get drunk at least once in a typical month;
  • One third of teen drinkers usually drink with the intention of getting drunk. Eighty-five percent of teen drinkers, who say that when they drink, they usually drink to get drunk, do so at least once a month. Of those teens who do NOT set out to get drunk, 33 percent find themselves drunk at least once a month.

Compared to teens who have never tried alcohol, teens who get drunk monthly are

  • 18 times more likely to have tried marijuana;
  • Four times more likely to be able to get marijuana in an hour;
  • Almost four times more likely to know someone their age who abuses prescription drugs;
  • More than three times more likely to have friends who use marijuana; and
  • More than twice as likely to know someone their age who uses meth, ecstasy, or other drugs such as cocaine, heroin, or LSD.

Compared to teens who have never tried alcohol, those who get drunk at least once a month are

  • Twice as likely to know a girl who was forced to do something sexual she didn't want to do; and
  • Nearly four times more likely to know a guy who uses drugs or alcohol.

Joseph A. Califano, Jr., CASA's chairman and founder and former U.S. Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare had this to say about the findings, "Some Moms' and Dads' behavior and attitudes make them parent enablers—parents who send their 12- to 17-year olds a message that it's okay to smoke, drink, get drunk and use illegal drugs like marijuana.... Teens' behavior is strongly associated with their parents' behavior and expectations, so parents who expect their children to drink and use drugs will have children who drink and use drugs."


January 28, 2008

Kansas SRS Announces $8.9 Million in Grants to Local Communities
Grant Funds Aimed at Reducing Underage Drinking

Topeka – The Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services (SRS) has awarded Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) Grants to fourteen Kansas community partnerships to support efforts to prevent and reduce underage drinking. 

Grants were awarded to the following community partnerships:

  • Clay Counts – Clay County
  • Drug Free Osage County – Osage County
  • Finney County Community Health Coalition – Finney County
  • Harper County ICC – Harper County
  • Kingman County Substance Abuse Prevention Group – Kingman County
  • Liberal Area Coalition for Families – Seward County
  • Linn County Children’s Coalition – Linn County
  • Quality of Life Coalition, Inc. – Dickinson County
  • Reno County Communities That Care Coalition – Reno County
  • Russell County Community Partnership – Russell County
  • Safe Streets Coalition – Shawnee County
  • Sumner County Community Drug Action Team – Sumner County
  • United 4 Youth – Nemaha County
  • Woodson County Interagency Coalition – Woodson County

“These grants allow the state to partner with local communities to achieve a shared goal of reducing underage drinking by building a solid foundation for service delivery that will benefit not only the current generation, but also future generations of Kansans,” said SRS Secretary Don Jordan.

Planning grant awards totaling approximately $600,000 will support a nine-month planning process to develop community-based strategies to impact underage drinking. Additional funds totaling approximately $8.3 million will be available to support implementation of approved community plans over the next three years. 

The Kansas SPF is intended to reduce underage drinking in target communities and enrich prevention efforts across the state through the implementation and sustainability of effective, culturally competent prevention strategies.

The Strategic Prevention Framework Grant is funded through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP). SRS is administering the grant process on behalf of the Governor’s Office.

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